digital marketing, Facebook, Marketing, Social Media

Social Media Incentives: Breeding Inauthentic Engagement

Content is King

The slap-dash solution for a lack of reach and engagement (I really do use those words way too much) always seems to be running a giveaway. But to what end?

For the brands I work with, nothing scares me more than when my client wants to run a giveaway, especially after months of perfecting the brand’s content, and it really is just an issue of how much inauthentic engagement you end up receiving.

People who aren’t interested in your product will flock en masse to your page, engage, engage, engage, and then just like a hot guy with no personality- will leave you feeling empty and shoot your stats down so fast and far you’ll be back at square one, just trying to get into a good space content-wise.

It’s all good and well that I whine about what shouldn’t be done, but what should the actual solution to increase reach and engagement be?

  1. Think about who the brand speaks to, who the target market is and what sort of content they consume online.
  2. Target bloggers, publications and personalities who your audience will resonate with and collaborate (emphasis on the word collaborate, not to be mistaken for “take my product and my creative and make people love me without any creative input”).
  3. Launch a campaign, it can be on little to no budget, but if it’s well thought out and passionate enough, people will respond. 
  4. Keep the momentum going even after the campaign is done, analyse which parts of the campaign worked best and capitalize on them.

Good social isn’t rocket science, but being one with your consumer takes a bold set of stress balls.

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Facebook, Marketing, Public Relations, Social Media

Social Media Strategy: Keep It Custom

The other day I found a Social Media agency bio that claimed being able to increase a fan base from 1k to 100k in the space of a few months which naturally made me throw up, but then I realised just how many agencies get big bucks based on bold (but not impossible) claims like this. I ranted on Twitter for a little while and reached the conclusion that South African brands and businesses need to be educated on what Social Media is, what it can do and what they should consider a success so that people aren’t being conned out of their money anymore.

Most brands and businesses in SA are still largely traditional, and are thus taken for a good old ride by agencies who will present them with a standard Social Media offering awash with buzzwords and bullshit statistics. More often than not, these agencies will convince client that Social Media is all about reach (maybe a little footsie talk about engagement too) and ultimately, they’ll get a nice fat sum to work with.

But that’s not how any of this works in my opinion.

Sit down with you client, acquaint yourself with their business, what their inspiration is, their goals and exactly what they expect to get out of Social Media. And then customise your strategy, target according to their desired audience, work your ass off so that their ROI is meaningful, so that their brand is positively affected by your work.

Establish whether they are local, regional or national, who they want to reach and where, then apply your knowledge of the industry, of influencers and the tone the business needs to take on. Social Media is so far past the point of every brand being witty and clever and sarcastic, it’s a way to reach consumers and fans on a human level beyond the theatrics we’ve become so used to.

Keep in mind that the nature of content differs from brand to brand and then requires optimisation from platform to platform, don’t be a doos and put a hardware business on tumblr, not unless it’s owned by top-knotted beardos who listen to Vance Joy.

Are they an international publication? Let them get reach, engagement and a kick ass CTR.

Are they a family run bakery? Help them engage with their customers, promote their yummies and reach new fans who are able (read: in the area) to visit.

Ain’t nothing standard about Social people, if it isn’t custom, it isn’t working.

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digital marketing, Facebook, Marketing, Social Media, Twitter

Social Media Under Traditional Control

So I got to thinking this morning, about how Social Media success is defined, by other agencies, and by clients, and the sad truth is that there are polar opposites in the way that success is defined, and therefore, the way that a strategy is formed.

A brand may decide to join Social Media to ‘engage’ with their consumers, but let’s face it, it all comes down to an ROI and a way to drive sales, and this is where the problem starts. When brands first became interested in the Social Media phenomenon, the need to engage with fans and consumers was what fueled the strategy at the time, but old habits die hard and brands are starting to look at Social Media figures like advertising ones.

Does the brand you manage really care about your engagement beyond how it affects the reach and number of likes it gets in return?

Have the number of Likes and Followers you have on Social Media become the modern day interpretation of what circulation figures were/are in the print advertising industry?

It’s this set of criteria that is based on huge numbers and not on content and authenticity that is coercing agencies to buy Like and Followers, because truthfully, who would ever find out right? But that’s the issue for me, how does 47% of inactive followers help your brand build awareness, affinity or drive sales? You may be meeting or surpassing your KPIs, but you’re killing the benefits of Social under the guise of how it can (mainly) only bring an ROI indirectly.

As someone who is passionate about Social, I’m not interested in the numbers, they mean very little to me compared to what the reaction to content is. Social Media is MEASURABLE, and that makes it better than print, but that certainly isn’t the be all and end all, not when delving into what makes your consumers tick is far more beneficial to you as a brand than knowing how many people saw your post.

Social Media isn’t here to be your brands bulletin board, no one wants to read your print-focused copy on an image that makes me feel like i’m sitting through an endless stream of print ads. Learn to use the medium, it isn’t a mag or a billboard, learn to get personal, learn from your fans, and remember that reaction always trumps the silly numbers.

I look at the Top Performing South African Brands on Social Media (now isn’t that a pleasant mouthful for brand managers?) and evaluate their content and the sort of feedback they get when they aren’t any incentives for fans or followers, and it makes me wonder how many agencies are cooking the numbers and getting away with it, and that there is a growing need for Social Media Legislation in SA.

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